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Australia’s motivation: Japan attacks

Australia’s motivation: Japan attacks

Whilst Australia’s motivation for bringing the case on Japanese Scientific Whaling to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) may be the result of domestic public pressure, the Government of Japan seems to have a more sceptical perspective.  Presenting their oral arguments to the court Japan argued that: ‘Another aspect of the case pertains to confining the…

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Why is Australia v Japan such a special case?

The history of contentious cases at the International Court of Justice (ICJ) is long, dating back to 1947. The ICJ was founded just a few years earlier in 1945 and is the principle judicial organ of the United Nations. A contentious case is one in which there is a legal dispute between countries (as opposed to a…

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Australia questions the science behind Japan’s whaling

Australian officials have questioned the scientific basis behind Japan’s Antarctic whale hunts on the opening two days of the public hearings at the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague. The Australian government has taken Japan to the court in a bid to expose the true nature Japanese ‘scientific’ research programme under which it…

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A Seismic Success …?

Back in March we asked you to stand up and say no to oil and gas exploration off the southern coast of Australia, we asked you to help save critical habitat for a plethora of species including the mighty blue whale and … you’ve done it. The Problem – Bight Petroleum submitted an application to…

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Conference – Whaling in the Antarctic' before the ICJ

In 2010 Australian commenced proceedings against Japan in the International Court of Justice with respect to Japan’s conduct of its JARPAII whaling program in the Southern Ocean. The case will commence its oral phase on 26 June 2013 with three weeks of hearings before the Court. This conference at the Australian National Univeristy seeks to…

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Dolphin deaths in Australia remain a mystery

Twenty four bottlenose dolphins, almost all juveniles, have died in Adelaide’s Gulf St Vincent in the past six weeks. At the same time, thousands of inshore reef fish have washed up on local beaches. The reason for these deaths remains unknown with initial analysis of some of the dead dolphins unable to determine their cause…

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