Skip to content

Campaigning at the International Whaling Commission

Keep the whaling ban in place

What does the International Whaling Commission do?

The IWC is the decision making body of the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling. The various governments that are members of the IWC make their decisions through its various meetings and committees, using the IWC secretariat to help manage their discussions and decision making.

The IWC website states that, "The main duty of the IWC is to keep under review and revise as necessary the measures laid down in the Schedule to the Convention which govern the conduct of whaling throughout the world."

How does WDC work with the IWC?

WDC attends the meeting to provide scientific, legal and conservation expertise to government delegates. We work with member nations to equip them with the knowledge and evidence they need to make informed decisions. WDC scientists also take part in research projects on behalf of the IWC, such as in Antarctica.

IWC meeting in Brazil

Which countries are members of the IWC?

The IWC: we've achieved a lot together

Keeping the ban in place: Despite many attempts by the whalers to overturn the moratorium (ban), WDC and other groups have helped ensure commercial whaling has not returned.

Making conservation a priority: Over the years, WDC has helped the IWC has to evolve from simply a meeting of whaling countries, to recognising and tackling a wide range of other related issues that impact whales, from climate change to pollution.

Exposing the whalers: Despite the moratorium, hundreds of whales are still hunted each year. WDC works to expose the horror behind these kills and keep the pressure on the whalers to cease these cruel hunts.

Latest Campaign News

Animal culture crucial for conservation says new research paper

WDC's Philippa Brakes, together with a number of experts working on a wide range of...

Can space technology tell us how many whales there are?

This exciting project is part of Deloitte's Gravity Challenge, a global programme that encourages corporates,...
Risso's dolphins are captured in Taiji hunt. Image: LIA and Dolphin Project

Heartbreak and practical action – the horror of the Taiji dolphin hunts and one Japanese activist’s determination

Back in November, I shared my heartache at the drama unfolding in the waters off...
minke whale breaching

Norway urged to abandon plans to experiment on captured whales

WDC has teamed up with the Animal Welfare Institute and NOAH (Norway's largest NGO for...

Meet the brainiacs of the underwater world – deep thinkers with intricate emotional lives

Whales and dolphins have big brains, and large brained beings have a few things in...

Growing up with the amazing Adelaide Port River dolphins

Squeak, one of the Port River dolphins If you are able to make a donation,...

Captivity ‘done and dusted’ in Australian state

The new regulations were introduced by NSW environment minister Matt Kean and followed inquiry into...

Norway’s government allows hunters to kill over 1200 whales this year

Norway's government allows the minke whale hunts to go ahead under an 'objection' to the...
Long-finned pilot whale

Pilot whales strand in New Zealand

Volunteer rescuers from Project Jonah, experts in attending strandings, were able to return nearly 30...

Whales and dolphins have flippin’ awesome support bubbles

Friends and family all get involved in bringing up the younger generation of whales and...

Cuts in government funds to hit Japanese whale hunt industry

Previously, Japan had slaughtered whales under the guise of 'research', even though next to nothing...

Joy and sadness watching Hector’s dolphins in their wild place

The widening estuary is deserted...  it was not always like this - a rusting trypot...