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Atlantic salmon net pens threaten wild salmon, endangered orcas

An investigation into the August 2017 disaster at an Atlantic salmon net pen facility in the Salish Sea, an inland waterway home to multiple types of whales and dolphins, found that the scale of the event was greatly downplayed by the owners of the fish farm.  Washington State launched an investigation into the facility after a net-pen collapsed and released hundreds of thousands of non-native Atlantic salmon into the ecosystem.

Dolphinarium in Japan to close as visitors stay away

Falling visitor numbers have caused a dolphinarium in Japan to announce it will close its doors.

The Inubasaka Marine Park, which opened in 1974, only now receives around 50,000 visitors a year, down from a peak of 300,000 a few years ago.

It is unclear what will happen to the dolphins held at the park but sadly it appears they will be moved to other facilities.

Find out more about why whales and dolphins should not be kept in captivity.

‘Talking’ orca not such great news

An orca held at a captive facility in France has apparently been trained to speak according to scientists.

The whale, called ’Wikie,’ is currently held in a tank at Marineland in Antibes. She has been recorded saying ‘Hello,’ ‘May,’ ‘one, two, three,’ and other words and phrases, after copying trainers saying the words directly or in recordings. This was part of a study created by scientists from St. Andrews and Madrid Universities.

Tourist bitten at captive dolphin facility

A tourist from Brazil is claiming compensation after she was allegedly bitten by a dolphin while leaving the water at a marine park in Colombia.

The incident occured while the woman was visiting the Oceanario Islas del Rosario near Cartegena. According to news reports she suffered injuries to her leg which the park was then unable to treat due to a lack of basic medical resources. A local clinic provided antibiotics to prevent infection.

Pupil power wins in war on plastic straws

Pupils at a school in Scotland have persuaded two major organisations to stop the use of plastic straws in their bid to reduce the amount of plastic pollution in the ocean.

Campaigners from Sunnyside Primary School in Glasgow, who have worked closely with WDC’s Shorewatch team and field officers in recent years, have convinced Scotland's biggest council to ban straws, and also Caledonian MacBrayne (CalMac) ferries to stop offering straws to customer on their vessels.

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