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True’s beaked whale

Mesoplodon mirus

True’s beaked whale

True's beaked whale

See all species Given that True’s beaked whales are found in two geographically distinct areas, it is thought that there might actually be two different species or sub-species of this beaked whale. Like other beaked whales True’s beaked whales have a ‘flipper pocket’, a small depression on each side of their body thought to assist…

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Southern bottlenose whale

Southern bottlenose whale

See all species Despite being the most commonly sighted species of beaked whale in the Antarctic, the southern bottlenose whale is one of the least well-studied species in the family Ziphiidae. The southern bottlenose whale forms an ‘anti-tropical species pair’ with the northern bottlenose whale. Other names: Antarctic bottlenose whale, Flatheaded bottlenose whale, Flathead Male…

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Andrews’ beaked whale

See all species Andrews’ beaked whales are one of the many great mysteries of our oceans; never once having been seen alive in the wild. Information about Andrews’ beaked whales is sparse, with the little that we do know coming solely from 20 strandings in the southern hemisphere. Leaving behind them a trail of questions…

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Ginkgo-toothed beaked whale

See all species The ginkgo-toothed beaked whales is named after the ginkgo tree. The tree is commonly found on the coastline in Japan near to where this beaked whale has predominantly been found. The shape of the male’s teeth are similar to the shape of the leaf. Other names: Japanese beaked whale Male Female Calf…

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Hector’s beaked whale

See all species Although first described from stranded remains in 1866, there has only been one confirmed sighting of a Hector’s beaked whale in the wild. Other names: Skew-beaked whale, New Zealand beaked whale Male Female Calf Maximum length 4.3m 4.3m 2.0m Maximum weight Unknown 1,840kg Unknown IUCN conservation status: Data Deficient What do Hector’s…

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Hubb’s beaked whale

See all species As the name suggests, Hubbs’ beaked whale was discovered by Carl Hubbs. Unfortunately, like other whales in this family, little is known about this mysterious lover of the deep. Other names: Arch-beaked whale Male Female Calf Maximum length 5.4m 5.4m 2.5m Maximum weight Unknown 1,500kg Unknown IUCN conservation status: Data Deficient What…

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Arnoux’s beaked whale

Arnoux's beaked whale

See all species All that we know about these elusive beings comes down to a few details. Secretive whales gliding through the southern seas, they leave many a mystery in their wake. Other names: Southern four-toothed whale Male Female Calf Maximum length 9.3m 9.75m 4m Maximum weight Unknown Unknown Unknown IUCN conservation status: Least Concern…

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Gervais’ beaked whale

Gervais' beaked whale

See all species The first recorded specimen of Gervais’ beaked whale was found floating in the English Channel in 1840. Despite this, most of the information about the Gervais’ beaked whale has been gleaned from strandings and a handful of confirmed sightings at sea. Other names: Antillean beaked whale, European beaked whale, Gulf stream beaked…

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Blainville’s beaked whale

Blainville's beaked whale

See all species With its steeply arched jaw, Blainville’s beaked whale is both striking and easily recognisable. Known for its unmistakable arch, Blainville’s beaked whale’s lower jaw curves sharply upwards. Especially striking, the male’s arch is topped with prominent tusks that point upwards past the upper jaw. Denser than elephant ivory, these distinctive features have…

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Gray’s beaked whale

Gray's beaked whale

See all species Gray’s beaked whales are slightly better known than other beaked whales. There have been several live sightings of individuals and small groups in the wild.  Many ‘beaked’ species have never been reliably sighted in the wild! Other names: Scamperdown whale, Southern beaked whale Male Female Calf Maximum length 5.7m 5.3m 2.1m Maximum weight…

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