Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching

More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Last captive Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin to be freed in South Korea

Bibongi, the last Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin held in captivity in South Korea, is to be returned to the wild after 17 years.

The country's Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries announced on August 3rd that it was to begin preparations for the male dolphin's eventual release, which includes a period of training him for life back in the wild.

Bibongi has been in captivity since 2005 when he was accidentally caught in a fishing net near Biyangdo Island, a small volcanic island off Jeju Island. He has spent the last 17 years performing in shows at the Pacific Resom (formerly Pacific Land) marine park in the Jeju city of Seogwipo.

It is thought that around 120 Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins live in the waters around Jeju island. In 2012, the species was designated an endangered marine species and afforded government protection and management.

Since then, eight dolphins that were held in marine parks around Korea have been released back into the wild. Bibongi is around 23 years old and will spend time in a sea pen learning how to catch live fish and reacclimatise to the marine environment before being released. He will be tracked and monitored to check on his health and integration back into the wild population.

The release programme in South Korea has been extremely successful so far. Three female dolphins returned to the wild have joined the wild population and given birth to calves.

Please donate today to help free all captive whales and dolphins.

Related News

More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine Mammal Areas (IMMAs), from northern Mexico to the southern tip...
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for many species, but fewer whales means fewer carcasses and that's...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports there. Ironically, whilst delegates from around the world at COP27...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their photographs.  Risso's dolphins are an amazing yet relatively little-known species....

Leave a Comment