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More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Shocking footage of captive orca butting head against wall

Distressing scenes have recently emerged from Marineland in Ontario where Kiska, the loneliest whale in the world, has been filmed violently thrashing her head against the side of her tank.

Kiska is a wild caught Icelandic orca who has spent the last four decades in captivity. She was just three years old when she was taken from her family and condemned to a life in a barren, concrete tank. The disturbing images that have gone viral on social media show how a life in captivity for over forty years has severely impacted her social and psychological development. Kiska has been without an orca companion since 2011 and is deprived of every aspect of the social culture she would have experienced in the wild.

Orcas, and indeed all whales and dolphins, are extremely poor candidates for life in captivity as no tank environment can ever provide the conditions that these free-ranging, powerful, highly intelligent and socially complex creatures need to thrive.

Never has there been a greater urgency for Kiska to be retired to a coastal, open water sanctuary where she can enjoy the rest of her days in a more natural environment….and hopefully in the company of other ex-captive orcas.

Find out more about orcas in captivity

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