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Over 570 whales killed during 2021 hunts in Norway

The highest number of whales killed in Norway since 2016 has been announced just as...
A wild orca in Iceland

Shocking footage of captive orca butting head against wall

Kiska is a wild caught Icelandic orca who has spent the last four decades in...
Atlantic white-sided dolphin

Even locals outraged as 1400 dolphins die in Faroese hunt

Much of the criticism has come from within the country where usually there is a...
Rescuing a stranded orca calf

Rescuers search for orca family after saving stranded calf

According to New Zealand rescue organisation Whale Rescue, the orca was found alone at Porirua,...

Sri Lanka oil spill brings fears for whales and dolphins

Spinner dolphins in Sri Lanka © Andrew Sutton
Spinner dolphins in Sri Lanka © Andrew Sutton

Experts are increasingly concerned at the plight of a Singapore-registered cargo ship, the X-Press Pearl, laden with nitric acid and other chemicals, which had been ablaze for almost a fortnight. The fire is now out but the vessel is slowly sinking off Negombo, near the capital, Colombo, on the west coast of Sri Lanka. This area is incredibly rich in marine life, including many species of whales and dolphins such as blue whales, sperm whales and several  dolphin species.

Hundreds of tonnes of oil risk being washed from the vessel and oil, chemicals and plastic debris are already leaching into the water and local conservation biologist and whale expert Ranil Nanayakkara reported that dead marine mammals are now washing ashore.

WDC plastics expert Pine Eisfeld-Pierantonio said: ‘This is an environmental disaster with consequences that will take years to come out in the open. The plastic spilling from the vessel is already polluting the pristine beaches and poses a threat to wildlife, as it can be ingested, poisoning the animals with chemicals soaked up from the sea water or making them feel full, even though they have not eaten anything nutritious to sustain them.’

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