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The horror – reflecting on the massacre of 1,428 dolphins on the Faroe Islands

Like you and millions of people around the globe, I felt horrified by the news...
Plastic pollution on beach

Plastic Free July – choose to refuse

Plastic is everywhere. When I look around me, I see a gazillion things made of...
Dolphin using a sponge as a tool in Shark Bay

Did you know dolphins use tools? Meet the Shark Bay spongers …

Like humans, dolphins live in societies with unique cultures. Like us, they bond with others...

One world ocean – why we need to think globally and act locally

On World Ocean(s) Day let's remember that there is only one ocean on our world....

Whale culture and conservation: to infinity and beyond …

In 1977, the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft launched, carrying with them the song of...
Risso's dolphins are captured in Taiji hunt. Image: LIA and Dolphin Project

Heartbreak and practical action – the horror of the Taiji dolphin hunts and one Japanese activist’s determination

Back in November, I shared my heartache at the drama unfolding in the waters off...

Meet the brainiacs of the underwater world – deep thinkers with intricate emotional lives

Whales and dolphins have big brains, and large brained beings have a few things in...

Growing up with the amazing Adelaide Port River dolphins

Squeak, one of the Port River dolphins If you are able to make a donation,...
All policy news
  • All policy news
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling

Minke whale hunts stop in Iceland

Iceland’s commercial hunt of minke whales has ended for this year. The common minke whale is the...
Port River dolphins

New report reveals 100,000 dolphins and small whales hunted every year

When you hear the words ‘dolphin hunts’ it’s likely that you think of Japan or...

End the whale hunts! Icelandic fin whaler isolated as public mood shifts

Here’s a sight I hoped never again to witness. A boat being scrubbed and repainted...

Australian Government to block Japanese whaling proposal

Japanese Government officials have reportedly confirmed that they will propose the resumption of commercial whaling...

Pregnant whales once again a target for Japanese whalers

Figures from Japan's whaling expedition to Antarctica during the 2017/18 austral summer have revealed that...

Did Icelandic whalers really kill a blue whale?

*Warning - this blog contains an image that you may find upsetting* They say a...

Icelandic whalers breach international law and kill iconic, protected whale by mistake

Icelandic whalers out hunting fin whales for the first time in three years appear to...

Doubts remain after Icelandic Marine Institute claims slaughtered whale was a hybrid not a blue

Experts remain sceptical of initial test results issued by the Icelandic Marine Institute, which indicate...

Japan set to resume commercial whaling

Reports from Japan suggest that the government they will formally propose plans to resume commercial...

Norway's whaling season begins

April 1st saw the start of the whaling season in Norway. Despite a widely-accepted international moratorium...

Norway increases whaling quota despite declining demand

Norway's government has announced an increase in the number of minke whales that can be...

Icelandic fin whale hunting to resume

Iceland’s only fin whaling company, Hvalur hf,  announced today that it will resume fin whaling...

Belugas take little steps to new life in sanctuary home

Our project with the SEA LIFE Trust to move two beluga whales, Little White and Little Grey,  from captivity in China to the world’s first whale sanctuary in Iceland has taken some significant  steps forward. We’re calling this phase ‘Little Steps’, because that’s what we and the whales are taking.

The whales made good progress in their care pools in the bay and in September were released to explore the wider sanctuary. Their first swims out were part of a carefully managed programme to introduce them into their much larger ocean home and they adapted well to their new surroundings.

LG and LW in bay week 1 the SLT Beluga Whale Sanctuary

If you are able to make a donation, it would mean the world.

Ideally this phase would have happened in the spring, giving the whales and their care team several months of acclimatisation to life in the bay before the Icelandic winter hit. But what none us could have predicted was the impact of a global pandemic.

After Little White and Little Grey’s successful first Little Steps into the wider bay, the expert team decided that, for the moment, it is safest for the whales if they are looked after in their custom-built landside care pool.

They were moved in a short 45-minute operation in early December and will stay until the milder spring weather allows us to return them to the bay to begin their new life there, giving them plenty of time to get ready for the next winter. Little White and Little Grey’s welfare will always be our priority and the decisions around their care made by the expert team are informed by the advice of independent veterinarians.

Little White and Little Grey’s first year in the sanctuary was always planned to look different to ongoing years. Of course it is disappointing they can’t stay in the bay all winter this year, but remember, they have the rest of their lives to enjoy the sanctuary and we have to get this right  not only for these two awesome individuals, but also for all the other whales who may come here in the future.

Please make a donation

to help WDC and the SEA LIFE Trust cover the costs of caring for Little White and Little Grey

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