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More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Success! Icelandic minke whale hunts end after years of WDC campaigning

Minke whale

Following on from the news that Iceland’s fin whaling vessels will not be leaving port this season to begin their annual hunts, it seems Iceland’s only minke whaling company is ending its hunts for good.

Gunnar Bergmann Jonsson, managing director of Icelandic company IP-Utgerd, which specializes in hunting minke whales, has told media that it was no longer profitable to hunt for the whales in Icelandic waters.

"I'm never going to hunt whales again, I'm stopping for good," Jonsson said.

The news represents a great success for WDC’s years of campaigning to stop whaling in Iceland and other nations across the globe.

Last week Kristian Loftsson, the owner of Iceland’s only fin whaling company, Hvalur hf’s, said that the fin whale hunts will not take place this season due to tough market conditions in Japan. However, whale meat popularity has been falling in Iceland, and for many years WDC has been illustrating the fact that commercial whaling has only survived because of perverse government subsidies abusing taxpayers’ monies to keep fleets afloat.

WDC CEO, Chris Butler-Stroud said, ‘This is tremendous news. It is also a turning point for Iceland and its people and something that WDC has campaigned for for years. An end to minke whaling, and the end in sight for fin whaling, gives Iceland the chance to position itself as the true green island of the North Atlantic.  The country can now build a new reputation for itself as one of the  best places in the world to watch whales and as host to the first ever sanctuary for ex-captive whales. WDC looks forward to continuing to work with Icelanders and celebrating a new ethical and sustainable relationship with whales and dolphins, one that values them alive.’

Icelandic whalers have slaughtered more than 1,700 whales (finminke and sei whales) since the global ban on commercial whaling came into force in 1986.

Contrary to popular belief, whale meat is not a traditional dish and local people rarely eat it. A 2016 survey revealed that only 1.5% of the population regularly purchases whale meat. Most of the minke whale catch is served up in restaurants to tourists.

Common minke whale

Please help us keep up the pressure and STOP all whaling.

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