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More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

80,000 dolphins dying each year in Indian Ocean nets

Dead dolphin in net

A new report has revealed the shocking figures behind dolphin deaths in fishing nets in the Indian Ocean, suggesting that populations may have dropped by over 80% in recent decades.

The study, led by Dr Charles Anderson of the Manta Marine organisation and published in the journal Endangered Species Research, paints a catastrophic picture, revealing that up to 80,000 whales and dolphins (mainly dolphins) could be trapped and dying in gill nets in the region each year.

Fishermen use gill nets to catch tuna for the commercial market. These nets hang like a curtain wall in the water catching fish but also other, non- target species including dolphins and whales.

Like us, whales and dolphins breathe air, so when they get tangled up in a net, rope or fishing line it is a race against time to reach the surface. In their desperation to escape and avoid suffocation, some tear muscles, break teeth, and sheer off fins. The more they struggle, the more entangled they can become.

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