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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...
Amazon River dolphin (Boto)

River dolphins observed playing with anaconda

Researchers in Bolivia recorded an unusual interaction between local rivers dolphins and an anaconda snake...

80,000 dolphins dying each year in Indian Ocean nets

Dead dolphin in net

A new report has revealed the shocking figures behind dolphin deaths in fishing nets in the Indian Ocean, suggesting that populations may have dropped by over 80% in recent decades.

The study, led by Dr Charles Anderson of the Manta Marine organisation and published in the journal Endangered Species Research, paints a catastrophic picture, revealing that up to 80,000 whales and dolphins (mainly dolphins) could be trapped and dying in gill nets in the region each year.

Fishermen use gill nets to catch tuna for the commercial market. These nets hang like a curtain wall in the water catching fish but also other, non- target species including dolphins and whales.

Like us, whales and dolphins breathe air, so when they get tangled up in a net, rope or fishing line it is a race against time to reach the surface. In their desperation to escape and avoid suffocation, some tear muscles, break teeth, and sheer off fins. The more they struggle, the more entangled they can become.

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