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More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Japanese whalers kill over 200 whales in commercial hunt

Bryde's whale

Japanese whalers returned to port today after completing the first commercial hunt since Japan left the International Whaling Commission (IWC) at the end of June.

The whalers killed 187 Bryde's whales, 25 sei whales and 11 minke whales, bringing back a total of around 1,430 tons of whale meat.

The Japanese Government announced that it would be leaving the IWC earlier in December 2018 and begin allocating its own quotas to the country's whalers. The whaling took place within Japan's 200 mile Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).

Less than 300 people are involved in the Japanese whaling industry. There is only limited demand for whale meat within Japan and the government provides millions of pounds of subsidies to the industry each year.

Many Japanese instead now enjoy seeing whales alive in the waters around Japan, where whale-watching has now been thriving for 30 years.

During the Rugby World Cup WDC is supporting this appreciation for living whales within Japan by asking you to tell the Japanese tourist authorities what you love about Japan.

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