Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching
Icelandic hunting vessels in port

Hunts to return in Iceland as bleak summer for whales looms

After a long wait, the decision on whether fin whale hunts in Iceland can go...

We are partnering with Michelin to take whales off the menu

We are delighted to announce that we are now working with Michelin, one of the...

Government report shows whales continue to suffer in Icelandic hunts

The Icelandic government's Food and Veterinary Authority (MAST - the country's expert council on animal...

Winning for whales at big international science meeting

Our team have been representing whales and dolphins at the important Scientific Committee meeting of...

New orca calf reported in endangered Southern Resident J pod

Southern resident orca

The Whale Centre in Tofino, British Columbia has revealed that a new calf has been spotted with an endangered orca population known as the Southern Residents.

The Southern Resident orcas of the Pacific Northwest is a group of 75 individuals, the only orca population listed as endangered in the U.S. As part of the Orca Salmon Alliance, we work with a number of other organisations to raise awareness and take action for these magnificent creatures.

This community was listed as endangered under Canada’s Species at Risk Act in 2003 and under the United States Endangered Species Act in 2005 after a 20% decline in the population between 1995 and 2001. The main threat to their existence is a lack of their primary prey, Chinook salmon. But they are also affected by toxic chemical pollution, increasing ocean noise, and vessel disturbance.

Researchers with Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the Center for Whale Research were notified and are reviewing the photos taken by The Whale Centre.

The Center for Whale Research – the official keepers of population data for Southern Resident orcas – have yet to confirm the new calf and provide an update on who the mother is, and we eagerly await their official announcement. Whilst one of the pod's orcas (J41 or Eclipse) was reported to be in the late stages of pregnancy by researchers, she has not yet been seen with a calf, and the families of new calves sometimes group so closely together, it can be hard to determine who the mother is right away.

As always with the Southern Residents, we are cautiously optimistic for the future of this unique community. New calves are beacons of hope, and also reminders that the orcas are doing their part to survive and thrive – it’s up to us to make sure they have an environment they can live in.

[shariff]

Related News

Healthy humpback whale helping an entangled humpback to the surface to breathe

The journey of an entangled whale

Hayley Flanagan Hayley is WDC's engagement officer, specialising in creating brilliant content for our website and publications. VIEW ALL HAYLEY'S BLOGS Visit author's linkedin profile...
Icelandic hunting vessels in port

Hunts to return in Iceland as bleak summer for whales looms

After a long wait, the decision on whether fin whale hunts in Iceland can go ahead this summer has been made by the government there...
Let's come together for the ocean

Together for the ocean – World Ocean Day 2024

Julia Pix Julia Pix is WDC's head of engagement. She delivers our public campaigns and supporter communications. VIEW ALL JULIA'S BLOGS More than 300,000 whales...

We are partnering with Michelin to take whales off the menu

We are delighted to announce that we are now working with Michelin, one of the most influential players in the food industry, to stop the...

Leave a Comment