Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching
Could this be an Omura's whale?

Rare ‘new’ whale may have been spotted for only the second time

An extremely elusive whale species has possibly been spotted for what is thought to be...
Blue whale © Andrew Sutton

Norway agrees to deep sea mining that threatens ocean wildlife

Norway's parliament has voted to allow mineral exploration on the Arctic seabed despite objections from...
Humpback whale

Scientists hold groundbreaking ‘chat’ with a whale

What is believed to be the first 'conversation' between humans and humpback whales has taken...

New Icelandic whaling licences should not be granted says WDC report

In anticipation of an application in coming weeks for new whale hunting licences by Hvalur...
All policy news
  • All policy news
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling
  • Strandings
Port River dolphins

New report reveals 100,000 dolphins and small whales hunted every year

When you hear the words ‘dolphin hunts’ it’s likely that you think of Japan or...

Minke whale hunts stop in Iceland

Iceland’s commercial hunt of minke whales has ended for this year. The common minke whale is the...

Icelandic whalers breach international law and kill iconic, protected whale by mistake

Icelandic whalers out hunting fin whales for the first time in three years appear to...

Pregnant whales once again a target for Japanese whalers

Figures from Japan's whaling expedition to Antarctica during the 2017/18 austral summer have revealed that...

Doubts remain after Icelandic Marine Institute claims slaughtered whale was a hybrid not a blue

Experts remain sceptical of initial test results issued by the Icelandic Marine Institute, which indicate...

Japan set to resume commercial whaling

Reports from Japan suggest that the government they will formally propose plans to resume commercial...

End the whale hunts! Icelandic fin whaler isolated as public mood shifts

Here’s a sight I hoped never again to witness. A boat being scrubbed and repainted...

Australian Government to block Japanese whaling proposal

Japanese Government officials have reportedly confirmed that they will propose the resumption of commercial whaling...

Did Icelandic whalers really kill a blue whale?

*Warning - this blog contains an image that you may find upsetting* They say a...

Norway's whaling season begins

April 1st saw the start of the whaling season in Norway. Despite a widely-accepted international moratorium...

SOS alert for whales off Norway!

I have to admit to bitter disappointment when I arrived in Tromsø, northern Norway, a...

Icelandic fin whale hunting to resume

Iceland’s only fin whaling company, Hvalur hf,  announced today that it will resume fin whaling...

Calls for tighter speed limit rules after calf dies in Port River

Following the death of a bottlenose dolphin calf called Holly, local experts are calling for tighter controls on speeding boats and other watercraft in Adelaide’s Port River.

Holly was only a week old when her body was found on January 2nd. An autopsy found signs of “blunt trauma”, possibly caused by a boat.

Findings from the South Australia Museum, who carried out the autopsy, indicate that 17 of the 35 known dolphin deaths in the Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary during the last 13 years had injuries consistent with boat collisions.

Dr Mike Bossley, whose work studying the dolphins WDC supports through our Adopt a Port River dolphin programme, told the Adelaide Advertiser: “The trouble is there are places that have got a speed limit of 10 knots (20km/h) that people just ignore and go flat out and there are plenty of places where there is no speed limit – that’s why there needs to be a review of the speed limits.”

Holly was the daughter of Ripple, one of the adoption dolphins and was born just before Christmas. Several other calves have been born in recent weeks in the area, where maximum penalties for harrassment can include two years imprisonment or a $100K fine.

Find out how you can adopt a Port River dolphin