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More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Port River dolphins lose two calves

2018 has got off to a sad start for the Port River dolphins in Adelaide with the loss of two calves in recent weeks.

Sparkle lost her 1 year old calf, Ruby and a few days later, Ripple was seen without her new calf, Holly, who was just one week old.

Ruby was known to have a deformed tail stock and an abnormality on her right pectoral fin but had seemed to be coping well while Holly appeared healthy from initial sightings.

The loss of two calves is a blow to this unique population of indo-pacific bottlenose dolphins that live just a few miles from the city centre. Around 30-40 dolphins are resident with up to 300 others dolphins visiting the area during the course of the year.

Improved water quality and the establishment of the Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary has led to increased sightings of dolphins in recent decades in the area. However, living so close to an urban environment and a busy port means the dolphins continue to face threats from numerous human activities. WDC is funding vital conservation and research efforts to protect these special creatures.

Support our work by adopting a Port River dolphin or making a donation at https://adopt-au.whales.org