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Hopes raised for whale and dolphin protection after last minute landmark nature agreement

WDC's Ed Goodall (far right) at COP15 with Thérèse Coffey (centre) UK Secretary of State...

WDC orca champion picks up award

Beatrice Whishart MSP picks up her Nature Champion award The Scottish Environment LINK, an organisation...

Large number of dolphins moved to Abu Dhabi marine park

Up to 24 captive bottlenose dolphins have reportedly been sent to a new SeaWorld theme...

Success! Removal of last river dams to help threatened orcas in the US

Great news has emerged from the US concerning our work to protect the endangered orca...
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  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
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Port River dolphins

New report reveals 100,000 dolphins and small whales hunted every year

When you hear the words ‘dolphin hunts’ it’s likely that you think of Japan or...

Minke whale hunts stop in Iceland

Iceland’s commercial hunt of minke whales has ended for this year. The common minke whale is the...

Icelandic whalers breach international law and kill iconic, protected whale by mistake

Icelandic whalers out hunting fin whales for the first time in three years appear to...

Doubts remain after Icelandic Marine Institute claims slaughtered whale was a hybrid not a blue

Experts remain sceptical of initial test results issued by the Icelandic Marine Institute, which indicate...

Japan set to resume commercial whaling

Reports from Japan suggest that the government they will formally propose plans to resume commercial...

End the whale hunts! Icelandic fin whaler isolated as public mood shifts

Here’s a sight I hoped never again to witness. A boat being scrubbed and repainted...

Australian Government to block Japanese whaling proposal

Japanese Government officials have reportedly confirmed that they will propose the resumption of commercial whaling...

Pregnant whales once again a target for Japanese whalers

Figures from Japan's whaling expedition to Antarctica during the 2017/18 austral summer have revealed that...

Did Icelandic whalers really kill a blue whale?

*Warning - this blog contains an image that you may find upsetting* They say a...

SOS alert for whales off Norway!

I have to admit to bitter disappointment when I arrived in Tromsø, northern Norway, a...

Norway's whaling season begins

April 1st saw the start of the whaling season in Norway. Despite a widely-accepted international moratorium...

Norway increases whaling quota despite declining demand

Norway's government has announced an increase in the number of minke whales that can be...

Dolphins to be used to locate highly endangered vaquita

According to reports from Mexico, the government there is to go ahead with plans to use dolphins trained by the US Navy to try to save the world’s most endangered marine species, the vaquita.

Vaquita are the world’s smallest and one of the most endangered species of whale, dolphin or porpoise on the planet. Found only in Mexico’s northern Gulf of California, the population has declined by more than 75% in the past three years and currently fewer than 50 vaquita remain.

The single biggest threat to this species is accidental catch in illegal fisheries targeting yet another endangered species, a fish known as Totoaba.  Smuggled into China, dried Totoaba swim bladders, worth more than $10,000 each, are used to make maw, a soup thought to boost fertility. 

Mexico’s Environment Minister, Rafael Pacchiano said that the dolphins would be deployed to locate and herd vaquitas into a marine refuge.

WDC has often spoken out against the use of dolphins in military exercises and opposes the captivity of whales and dolphins for human entertainment but the story of the vaquita is not about captivity. Vaquita are on the brink of extinction because of the inadequate management efforts in place over past decades to prevent illegal fishing and illegal trade.

The near extinction of Vaquita was preventable. The plan to save Vaquita is uncertain and controversial, but the need to prevent the unnecessary bycatch and illegal trade of endangered species is not. We continue to support the efforts to ban all gillnetting within the Vaquita habitat and continue to work to reduce the threat of bycatch to all whales, dolphins, and porpoises. 

Join our campaign to stop dolphins, porpoises and whales dying in fishing gear in UK waters.