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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...
Mykines Lighthouse, Faroe Islands

Understanding whale and dolphin hunts in the Faroe Islands – why change is not easy

Most people in my home country of the Faroe Islands would like to see an...

Dolphin scientists look like you and me – citizen science in action

Our amazing volunteers have looked out for dolphins from the shores of Scotland more than...
Atlantic white-sided dolphins

The Faroes dolphin slaughter that sparked an outcry now brings hope

Since the slaughter of at least 1,423 Atlantic white-sided dolphins at Skálafjørður in my home...

Caithness Orca Watch week

WDC is once again participating in the annual Caithness Orca Watch week off the north coast of Scotland. Organised by the SeaWatch Foundation, the event is now in its 6th year and yesterday got off to a cracking start. Throughout the day there were hundreds of dedicated orca watchers up on the cliffs at Duncansby Head near John O Groats scanning the waters of the Pentland Firth. WDC’s Shorewatch team were also out in force helping track an elusive pod of orcas as they passed through the Firth.

The orcas spotted here at this time of year are from Iceland and we believe these individuals, who normally feed on herring in Iceland, come down to Scotland to feed on seals. We had just been watching a family of otters playing on the rocks at the base of the cliffs when the call went up that a group of orcas were crossing over from the Orkney Islands and heading straight for us at Duncansby. For the next hour or so we all watched in awe as the pod made a very close pass to us right under the cliff before heading further offshore and south towards Sinclair Bay. Later that evening we had confirmation from Dr Filipa Samarra of the Icelandic Orca Project that the large male we had been watching was known as The Hulk (062/IS015) – an orca I had seen many times in Grundarfjordur, Iceland but I had never before seen in Scotland.

This was another exciting piece of the jigsaw puzzle and great testament to the power of citizen science.