Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching
Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...
Amazon River dolphin (Boto)

River dolphins observed playing with anaconda

Researchers in Bolivia recorded an unusual interaction between local rivers dolphins and an anaconda snake...

New insight into how narwhals use their tusks

Drone footage taken by researchers from WWF studying narwhals in north-eastern Canada has revealed how the whales use their unique tusks to hunt for fish. 

The whales could clearly be seen tapping the fish to stun it before consuming the prey. The tusk is in fact a large canine tooth, usually only found on male narwhals. Little is known about the narwhal as it is generally shy and is only found in the arctic. Previously it was thought the whales only fed during the winter but this footage shows them catching prey during the summer season.

Loss of habitat as industrial development and shipping increases in the arctic are a major threat to species, along with changes in sea ice distribution which impacts on the availability of food.