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Fin whale

Fin whales return to old feeding grounds in Southern Ocean

An exciting discovery by researchers in the waters around Antarctica suggest that fin whales are...
Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...
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  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Prevent deaths in nets
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Minke whale hunts stop in Iceland

Iceland’s commercial hunt of minke whales has ended for this year. The common minke whale is the...
Port River dolphins

New report reveals 100,000 dolphins and small whales hunted every year

When you hear the words ‘dolphin hunts’ it’s likely that you think of Japan or...

End the whale hunts! Icelandic fin whaler isolated as public mood shifts

Here’s a sight I hoped never again to witness. A boat being scrubbed and repainted...

Australian Government to block Japanese whaling proposal

Japanese Government officials have reportedly confirmed that they will propose the resumption of commercial whaling...

Pregnant whales once again a target for Japanese whalers

Figures from Japan's whaling expedition to Antarctica during the 2017/18 austral summer have revealed that...

Did Icelandic whalers really kill a blue whale?

*Warning - this blog contains an image that you may find upsetting* They say a...

Icelandic whalers breach international law and kill iconic, protected whale by mistake

Icelandic whalers out hunting fin whales for the first time in three years appear to...

Doubts remain after Icelandic Marine Institute claims slaughtered whale was a hybrid not a blue

Experts remain sceptical of initial test results issued by the Icelandic Marine Institute, which indicate...

Japan set to resume commercial whaling

Reports from Japan suggest that the government they will formally propose plans to resume commercial...

Norway's whaling season begins

April 1st saw the start of the whaling season in Norway. Despite a widely-accepted international moratorium...

Norway increases whaling quota despite declining demand

Norway's government has announced an increase in the number of minke whales that can be...

Icelandic fin whale hunting to resume

Iceland’s only fin whaling company, Hvalur hf,  announced today that it will resume fin whaling...

No fin whaling in Iceland this summer!

WDC warmly welcomes the news that there will be no fin whaling in Iceland this summer, saving the lives of up to 184 endangered fin whales. Kristjan Loftsson, CEO of Hvalur hf, Iceland´s sole fin whaling company, made the announcement that no fin whaling will be happening in Icelandic waters for the second year running. The main reasons given are the endless obstacles within Japan relating to imports of whale products, which have particularly frustrated Loftsson, since Japan has long been his main outlet. Loftsson also cited the currently very strong Icelandic krona as a reason for increased uncertainty around profits from exports.

A record 155 fin whales were caught during the 2015 season, but last year’s hunt was cancelled due to import difficulties and it seems that despite attempts by Icelandic officials and experts to speak to their counterparts in Japan, the obstacles remain.

Last year, Loftsson complained bitterly about what he described as Japan’s unfair and antiquated methods for testing and analyzing meat.

Loftsson has stopped whaling in the past, only to resume once circumstances improved, so we should remain vigilant. It is important, also, that we don’t lose sight of the fact that the minke whaling persists: indeed the minke whalers have just announced that they will be going out as early as next month. 

Support our work to end whaling in Iceland once and for all

Breaching fin whale