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Hopes raised for whale and dolphin protection after last minute landmark nature agreement

WDC's Ed Goodall (far right) at COP15 with Thérèse Coffey (centre) UK Secretary of State...

WDC orca champion picks up award

Beatrice Whishart MSP picks up her Nature Champion award The Scottish Environment LINK, an organisation...

Large number of dolphins moved to Abu Dhabi marine park

Up to 24 captive bottlenose dolphins have reportedly been sent to a new SeaWorld theme...

Success! Removal of last river dams to help threatened orcas in the US

Great news has emerged from the US concerning our work to protect the endangered orca...

China’s backwards step ignores growing public feeling against breeding orcas in captivity

Just as public opinion turns against keeping orcas in captivity, China has decided to launch a new orca-breeding facility.

Nine orcas have been revealed to the public, five male and four female, at the country’s new breeding base at Chimelong Ocean Kingdom in Guangdong Province.

The move seems particularly strange coming as it does when organizations around the world are looking to end such breeding programmes like this and the public turns its back on cruel captivity shows.

 

SeaWorld, the giant US aquarium and marine life park, has now ended orca breeding. The governor of California signed legislation last week banning orca breeding and orca performances in the state from June, and legislation introduced to the US Congress this month could end orca captivity in the US. A number of US states have already banned the practice, as have some countries. 

Orcas in captivity have been shown to have much shorter life-spans and to display abnormal behaviour not seen in the wild. There are around 500 marine mammals in captivity in China, according to government records.

More on orcas held in Chinese marine parks.