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Fin whale

Fin whales return to old feeding grounds in Southern Ocean

An exciting discovery by researchers in the waters around Antarctica suggest that fin whales are...
Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...

Whale ears could reveal secrets of underwater noise pollution

Researchers are using the ears of whales that died after stranding on beaches to try to work out how they are affected by increasing, man-made underwater noise levels.

Scientist, Maria Morell has been working with staff from the Scottish Marine Animal Strandings Scheme to produce a study (published in Scientific Reports) examining the inner ears taken from long finned pilot whales that died in mass strandings in Fife in 2012 and on Skye in 2015.

Whales and dolphins live in a world of sound using echo location to communicate, find food and socialise. Any increase in noise levels from man-made sources like military activity, oil and gas exploration or boat traffic can cause whales and dolphins to strand, or even die.