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Fin whale

Fin whales return to old feeding grounds in Southern Ocean

An exciting discovery by researchers in the waters around Antarctica suggest that fin whales are...
Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...

Mystery of orca menopause revealed in new report

Theories around why female orcas, like humans, go through the menopause have now been confirmed, after the release of a report detailing years of study led by Prof Darren Croft from the University of Exeter.

Orcas are one of just three species that go through menopause – stopping reproduction part-way through their lives. By recording every birth and death in a large number of orca families, the research group concluded that this is a rare and clever piece of evolution that increases the chances of survival for their young.  It is thought that the menopause may be a process that prevents ‘reproductive conflict’ between mothers and daughters, and could well play a similar role for humans.

By living long after they have stopped reproducing, female orcas can then spend the rest of their life looking after their offspring. Young orcas are unusual in that they continue to live with their mothers for the duration of the mother’s life and mum plays a very important part in the family group – passing on knowledge to their young, such as when and where to get food.

Read the report in the journal Current Biology.

Why not adopt an orca.?