Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
This dolphin was trapped in a plastic ring but, thankfully, successfully freed. Photograph was taken by Q. Gibson, University of North Florida, under the authority of NMFS LOC No. 14157

To save whales, dolphins and the world, we need a global treaty on plastic pollution

Millions of tonnes of plastic enter the environment every year impacting ecosystems and species. Plastic...
Humpback whale Salt with her calf

A humpback whale teacher named Salt who helps keep you and me alive

Salt is a remarkable whale. In fact she's probably the most famous humpback whale in...
Blue whale (balaenoptera musculus) A blue whale tail at sunset. Gulf of California.

Whales, trees and butterflies – how we’re giving a voice to the ocean at COP26

I'm in Glasgow representing WDC, Whale and Dolphin Conservation at COP26, the UN's 26th climate...
Gray whale (eschrichtius robustus) The eye of  a gray whale. Pacific coast Mexico.

Save the whale, save the world – because our lives depend on it

Carl Sagan famously called our planet a 'pale blue dot' when he saw the first...
© WDC

The horror – reflecting on the massacre of 1,428 dolphins on the Faroe Islands

Like you and millions of people around the globe, I felt horrified by the news...
Plastic pollution on beach

Plastic Free July – choose to refuse

Plastic is everywhere. When I look around me, I see a gazillion things made of...
Dolphin using a sponge as a tool in Shark Bay

Did you know dolphins use tools? Meet the Shark Bay spongers …

Like humans, dolphins live in societies with unique cultures. Like us, they bond with others...

One world ocean – why we need to think globally and act locally

On World Ocean(s) Day let's remember that there is only one ocean on our world....

Are the Japanese people growing tired of whaling?

The influential Japanese news title, the Asahi Shimbun, through an editorial, is calling on the Japanese Government to change its whaling strategy. In its editorial of November 1st 2016, titled It’s time for Japan to change its controversial whaling strategy, the paper believes that at this year’s meeting of the International Whaling Commission, ‘Japan appears to have lost more than it gained’.

The paper quite rightly separates out the fact from the fiction as reported by Japanese Fisheries officials, that Japan is now losing more at the IWC than it is gaining, and at huge expense to the Japanese taxpayer. It notes, that,

‘Demand for whale meat in Japan has declined sharply over time. But the government spends several billions of yen annually on subsidies to keep the scientific whaling program alive.’

It goes on to ask,

‘The question that the government should ask itself is whether it can serve Japan’s national interests by sticking to its apparently “dead-end” policy.’

Whilst WDC does not agree that Japan should even continue with its small type commercial whaling as advocated by the Asahi Shimbun, we welcome the fact that Japanese press is finally waking up to the fact that Japanese Government policy on the issue of whaling is simply damaging to Japan and its national interests.

You can see what happened at the 2016 IWC in WDC extensive coverage and you can also find out more about the facts and figures related to whaling.