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Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

https://au.whales.org/2022/10/14/nearly-500-whales-die-in-new-zealand/

Sri Lanka to crack down on illegal sale of whale and dolphin meat

Sri Lanka Fisheries Minister, Mahinda Amaraweera has ordered the Sri Lankan navy and coastguard to take legal action against fishermen killing dolphins and small whales in the waters off Mirissa, southwest of the island. He has also instructed police to arrest those found selling whale or dolphin meat at local markets.

These creatures have been legally protected in Sri Lankan waters since 1993 however, since the introduction of nylon gillnets in the 1960s, fishermen have frequently caught dolphins and small whales in their nets and sold the meat at local markets.  Some local fishermen have even been tempted to deliberately harpoon dolphins in order to supplement their income and compensate for poor fish catches.

The Minister has stressed the responsibility of the nation to protect the marine mammals in waters around Sri Lanka, highlighting the benefits to the Sri Lankan economy. Whale watching  is extremely popular off Mirissa, attracting thousands of tourists each year.