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Mindful conservation – why we need a new respect for nature

'We should look at whales and dolphins as the indigenous people of the seas -...
A dolphin called Arnie with a shell

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

Did you know that dolphins have unique personalities?

We all have personalities, and between the work Christmas party and your family get-together, perhaps...
Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...
Humpback whale. Image: Christopher Swann

A story about whales and humans

As well as working for WDC, I write books for young people. Stories; about the...
Risso's dolphin at surface

My lucky number – 13 years studying amazing Risso’s dolphins

Everything we learn about the Risso's dolphins off the coast of Scotland amazes us and...
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...

Future fishing rules must include better bycatch monitoring and reduction

Future fishing rules in European waters, like elsewhere in the world, need to include transparent management and better mitigation of marine life bycatch – for all countries, whether or not they are part of the EU.

WDC are calling for a clear, effective strategy to identify the steps that are required by all countries that share European waters to reduce bycatch of porpoises, dolphins and whales towards zero. WDC, with experts from other organisations, have published this week on the necessary steps required to better protect cetaceans from bycatch

Bycatch remains a major conservation and welfare concern in European waters, with high numbers of harbour porpoises, dolphins and whales continuing to die each year. Steps urgently needed include to:

  • Improve collection of data on fishing activities
  • Improve and unify cetacean population surveillance and bycatch monitoring, with better implementation and enforcement
  • Develop a more regionalised evidence-based approach to monitoring and mitigation
  • Robustly show that bycatch levels are decreasing over time
  • Develop an Action Plan to identify in detail the steps required to reduce cetacean bycatch in European waters