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Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Sperm whale (physeter macrocephalus) Gulf of California. The tail of a sperm whale.

To protect whales, we must stop ignoring the high seas

Almost two-thirds of the ocean, or 95% of the habitable space on Earth, are sloshing...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...

Like the dolphins, like dolphins can swim

This afternoon, I joined hundreds of people, young and old, as we marched through central London in brilliant winter sunshine. As we headed down Regent Street and along Piccadilly, the air rang with singing, drums and whistles, whilst colourful flags and banners jostled for space against the skyline. Despite the carnival atmosphere, we marched with a common – and grim – purpose: to honour the hundreds of dolphins brutally killed or captured so far this season in the ‘killing cove’ in Taiji and to call upon Japan to end the bloodshed.

Congregating in front of the Japanese Embassy, the crowd sang along to Heroes, the song which David Bowie, a quiet supporter of dolphins and animal rights, allowed to be used as a rallying call at the end of the documentary, The Cove.  Since then, it has been adopted as the anthem to the campaign against the drive hunts at Taiji and of course, was sung this week – of all weeks – in homage to the man as much as to the cause.

I found the whole experience extremely poignant – but what possibly moved me more than anything was the realisation of just how many people care about the dolphins’ plight and are determined to do something to end their suffering. 

Today, London called – let us hope that someone in Tokyo is listening.