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Humpback whale playing with kelp

Why do humpback whales wear seaweed wigs?

Alison Wood Ali is WDC's education projects coordinator. She is the editor of Splash! and KIDZONE,...
Japanese whaling ship

WDC in Japan – Part 5: The meaning of whaling

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Risso's dolphins off the Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Unravelling the mysteries of Risso’s dolphins – WDC in action

Nicola Hodgins Nicola is WDC's cetacean science coordinator. She leads our long-term Risso's dolphin research...
Save the whale save the world on a tv in a meeting room.

Saving whales in boardrooms and on boats

Abbie Cheesman Abbie is WDC's head of strategic partnerships. She works with leading businesses to...
Outcomes of COP28

Outcomes for whales and dolphins from COP28

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...
Taiji's cove with boats rounding up dolphins to be slaughtered or sold to aquraiums

WDC in Japan – Part 4: A journey to Taiji’s killing cove

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Blue whale at surface

Creating a safe haven for whales and dolphins in the Southern Ocean

Emma Eastcott Emma is WDC's head of safe seas. She helps ensure whales and dolphins...
We're at COP28 to Save the Whale, Save the World.

We’re at COP28 to save the whale, save the world

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...

Like the dolphins, like dolphins can swim

This afternoon, I joined hundreds of people, young and old, as we marched through central London in brilliant winter sunshine. As we headed down Regent Street and along Piccadilly, the air rang with singing, drums and whistles, whilst colourful flags and banners jostled for space against the skyline. Despite the carnival atmosphere, we marched with a common – and grim – purpose: to honour the hundreds of dolphins brutally killed or captured so far this season in the ‘killing cove’ in Taiji and to call upon Japan to end the bloodshed.

Congregating in front of the Japanese Embassy, the crowd sang along to Heroes, the song which David Bowie, a quiet supporter of dolphins and animal rights, allowed to be used as a rallying call at the end of the documentary, The Cove.  Since then, it has been adopted as the anthem to the campaign against the drive hunts at Taiji and of course, was sung this week – of all weeks – in homage to the man as much as to the cause.

I found the whole experience extremely poignant – but what possibly moved me more than anything was the realisation of just how many people care about the dolphins’ plight and are determined to do something to end their suffering. 

Today, London called – let us hope that someone in Tokyo is listening.