Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching
Could this be an Omura's whale?

Rare ‘new’ whale may have been spotted for only the second time

An extremely elusive whale species has possibly been spotted for what is thought to be...
Blue whale © Andrew Sutton

Norway agrees to deep sea mining that threatens ocean wildlife

Norway's parliament has voted to allow mineral exploration on the Arctic seabed despite objections from...
Humpback whale

Scientists hold groundbreaking ‘chat’ with a whale

What is believed to be the first 'conversation' between humans and humpback whales has taken...

New Icelandic whaling licences should not be granted says WDC report

In anticipation of an application in coming weeks for new whale hunting licences by Hvalur...

UK man admits to eating dolphin

A man in Cornwall who regularly eats animals that have been killed by traffic (road kill), is potentially facing prosecution after admitting to eating dolphin meat. He is intending to eat a casserole at Christmas made from the remains of a common dolphin he found dead stranded on a beach.

However, under UK law it is illegal to be “in possession of part or a whole” of a protected species including a dolphin. Penalties include up to six months in prison or an unlimited fine if convicted. 

Dolphins also fall under the seldom used Royal Prerogative for Fishes Royal.

Regardless of the legal position, eating the meat would be very unwise. Dolphins can carry diseases which are transferable to humans, and are usually taken away by local authorities to be buried in landfill.

Whales and dolphins can also be heavily contaminated. Pilot whales, for example often carry high levels of mercury. Anyone who does come across a dead whale or dolphins should contact the UK Strandings Hotline.