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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...
Amazon River dolphin (Boto)

River dolphins observed playing with anaconda

Researchers in Bolivia recorded an unusual interaction between local rivers dolphins and an anaconda snake...

UK man admits to eating dolphin

A man in Cornwall who regularly eats animals that have been killed by traffic (road kill), is potentially facing prosecution after admitting to eating dolphin meat. He is intending to eat a casserole at Christmas made from the remains of a common dolphin he found dead stranded on a beach.

However, under UK law it is illegal to be “in possession of part or a whole” of a protected species including a dolphin. Penalties include up to six months in prison or an unlimited fine if convicted. 

Dolphins also fall under the seldom used Royal Prerogative for Fishes Royal.

Regardless of the legal position, eating the meat would be very unwise. Dolphins can carry diseases which are transferable to humans, and are usually taken away by local authorities to be buried in landfill.

Whales and dolphins can also be heavily contaminated. Pilot whales, for example often carry high levels of mercury. Anyone who does come across a dead whale or dolphins should contact the UK Strandings Hotline.