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Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Nearly 500 whales die in New Zealand

https://au.whales.org/2022/10/14/nearly-500-whales-die-in-new-zealand/

Seventh new calf in Southern Resident orca population

Yesterday, the Center for Whale Research in Friday Harbor, Washington confirmed a new calf in L pod, the third for this pod and the seventh for the entire population since December 2014.  The critically endangered Southern Resident orca population is divided into three pods: J, K, and L, and has seen a rare “baby boom” this year with six new calves observed in 2015, three in L pod and three in J pod (Scarlet (J50), who set off the baby boom, was born in December 2014).  The latest arrival, designated L123, is the first known calf of 12-year-old Lapis (L103).  L123 was first observed on November 12th, but CWR was unable to confirm the new addition until recently.

The new calves are certainly cause for celebration, but these endangered whales are still struggling to survive.  Before this year, the population had not had a surviving calf in two and a half years, and has lost more than 20 individuals since 2010.  Prey scarcity is one of the biggest threats to this population, and with seven new mouths to feed it is more important than ever to ensure the Southern Residents have an abundant supply of their preferred food, Chinook salmon.  Chinook can be up to 90% of the Southern Residents’ diet, and their survival is closely correlated with salmon abundance in the Pacific Northwest.