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Fin whale

Fin whales return to old feeding grounds in Southern Ocean

An exciting discovery by researchers in the waters around Antarctica suggest that fin whales are...
Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...

Another calf for the Southern Resident orcas

Researchers have confirmed the birth of the 5th orca calf this year to be born to the Southern Resident population of orcas living off the north-west Pacific coast.

A team from the Center for Whale Research identified the calf, named L122, earlier this week. The calf was swimming with its mother, a 20-year-old orca known as L91 who is a member of the L Pod. It brings the total population up to 82 individuals (27 in the J Pod, 19 in the K Pod and 36 now in the L Pod).

The Southern Resident orcas are recognised as endangered by US law. Their numbers were severely depleted in the 1960s and 70s after many whales from the population were taken into captivity by marine parks such as SeaWorld or died during the capture process. Only one whale, Lolita, still survives. She is held alone at the Miami Seaquarium.

Southern Resident orca J36 Alki A Southern Resident orca.