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Hopes raised for whale and dolphin protection after last minute landmark nature agreement

WDC's Ed Goodall (far right) at COP15 with Thérèse Coffey (centre) UK Secretary of State...

WDC orca champion picks up award

Beatrice Whishart MSP picks up her Nature Champion award The Scottish Environment LINK, an organisation...

Large number of dolphins moved to Abu Dhabi marine park

Up to 24 captive bottlenose dolphins have reportedly been sent to a new SeaWorld theme...

Success! Removal of last river dams to help threatened orcas in the US

Great news has emerged from the US concerning our work to protect the endangered orca...

Another calf for the Southern Resident orcas

Researchers have confirmed the birth of the 5th orca calf this year to be born to the Southern Resident population of orcas living off the north-west Pacific coast.

A team from the Center for Whale Research identified the calf, named L122, earlier this week. The calf was swimming with its mother, a 20-year-old orca known as L91 who is a member of the L Pod. It brings the total population up to 82 individuals (27 in the J Pod, 19 in the K Pod and 36 now in the L Pod).

The Southern Resident orcas are recognised as endangered by US law. Their numbers were severely depleted in the 1960s and 70s after many whales from the population were taken into captivity by marine parks such as SeaWorld or died during the capture process. Only one whale, Lolita, still survives. She is held alone at the Miami Seaquarium.

Southern Resident orca J36 Alki A Southern Resident orca.