Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching

More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Latest Japanese research trip ends with 115 whales dead

Ten weeks of so-called ‘research’ have come to an end in the northwestern Pacific with Japanese hunting ships slaughtering over 100 whales.

According to the Japanese Fisheries Agency, 90 sei whales and 25 Bryde’s whales have been taken since the hunts began on June 11th.

Despite an international ban on commercial whaling, Japan has continued to kill whales under an exemption for ‘research’. The government agency claims that the activity is aimed at contributing to resource management by analyzing such things as the contents of their stomachs and other organs. However, much of the meat ends up on sale to the public and, regardless of the decline in the consumption of whale meat, the country’s whaling industry continues to be propped up by subsidises from the Japanese government.

Japanese whaling

In March last year the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruled that Japan’s whaling activities in the Antarctic violated the International Convention of the Regulation of Whaling, and ordered the hunts to stop. Tokyo halted the programme in the Antarctic but said it would continue to hunt whales in local coastal areas and the northwestern Pacific.

Despite the court decision, Japanese officials have since announced that the Antarctic hunts will start again in the future too.

Help WDC stop whaling.