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Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

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Orca Watch in Scotland …the results are in

The WDC team has now left Scotland and the beautiful Caithness coastline but the sightings continue.

During our week in the far north we were fortunate enough to see orcas, humpback whales, minke whales and harbour porpoise from our vantage point at Duncansby Head, just two miles from John O Groats.

Other keen whale watchers stationed at strategic points along the coast such as Noss Head, Strathy Point and Dunnet Head had similar encounters.

There was so much enthusiasm and excitement from locals and visitors alike whenever there were whales passing and not even the unpredictable Scottish weather could dampen anyone’s spirit.

Orcas are typically seen in this region from April to July but are also recorded in other months too.

Certain individuals in this area have been identified as being a part of the Icelandic herring-eating population and have made the 900 mile journey south presumably to coincide with the local seal pupping season.

The dedicated local Sea Watch Foundation Coordinator has compiled the following sightings data for the Caithness region since early April.

Huge thanks to Colin Bird and Anna Jemmett for so generously sharing all their sightings data here.

Thanks also to Sam L, Liz S, Margaux D, Andy S, Katie D, Trish C and Karen M for making the week extremely enjoyable and so rewarding.

See you in 2016.