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Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...
Amazon River dolphin (Boto)

River dolphins observed playing with anaconda

Researchers in Bolivia recorded an unusual interaction between local rivers dolphins and an anaconda snake...

New understanding of whale communication

Sound is the most important sense for whales. They use it to communicate with another as well as finding their way around the oceans, and in some species to catch their prey too.

Up to now it has not been clear why different whales have evolved with different systems to hear but now scientists think they might have made a key breakthrough. Researchers from the world-renowned Smithsonian Institution in Washington think it may be to do with the different methods used by toothed whales (e.g. sperm whale), and baleen whales (e.g. blue whale), to catch their prey.

The video report below from the BBC reveals more.