Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
Humpback whale playing with kelp

Why do humpback whales wear seaweed wigs?

Alison Wood Ali is WDC's education projects coordinator. She is the editor of Splash! and KIDZONE,...
Japanese whaling ship

WDC in Japan – Part 5: The meaning of whaling

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Risso's dolphins off the Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Unravelling the mysteries of Risso’s dolphins – WDC in action

Nicola Hodgins Nicola is WDC's cetacean science coordinator. She leads our long-term Risso's dolphin research...
Save the whale save the world on a tv in a meeting room.

Saving whales in boardrooms and on boats

Abbie Cheesman Abbie is WDC's head of strategic partnerships. She works with leading businesses to...
Outcomes of COP28

Outcomes for whales and dolphins from COP28

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...
Taiji's cove with boats rounding up dolphins to be slaughtered or sold to aquraiums

WDC in Japan – Part 4: A journey to Taiji’s killing cove

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Blue whale at surface

Creating a safe haven for whales and dolphins in the Southern Ocean

Emma Eastcott Emma is WDC's head of safe seas. She helps ensure whales and dolphins...
We're at COP28 to Save the Whale, Save the World.

We’re at COP28 to save the whale, save the world

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...

Journey to the Ross Sea #4

The day finally dawned that many passengers had been looking forward to for months, years and for some – me included – a lifetime as we boarded the Ortelius, the mother ship and our Ark for the next 30 days and 30 nights.

Ahead of us lay the 2,500 mile journey to the Ross Sea and beyond. By the time we reach our final destination in Ushuaia, Argentina on March 13th we would have covered a staggering 6,000 miles.

There are 85 of us on board from all over the world and we must have looked a motley bunch as we carried out our polar lifeboat and safety exercises while still on the dock in a sweltering 26 degrees Celsius – Bluff’s hottest day in over two years!

Most tourists to Antarctica visit the Peninsula side of the continent typically on 10/11 day cruise or 18/19 days if they wish take in South Georgia and The Falklands. There are very few departures to the Ross Sea side of the continent and my fellow passengers and I are fortunate to be amongst the small, elite group of no more than 250 or so people who get to make this journey each year.

After a few briefings on expedition and ship etiquette we got underway and the Ortelius is now making good speed across the Southern Ocean. Look out of any porthole and you will see our outriders – albatross and petrels who are quickly becoming our constant companions as we steam South. Tomorrow, weather-permitting, we will make a landing on the Campbell Island – a sub-Antarctic paradise and UNESCO World Heritage site which is rightly famous for its Southern Royal Albatross colonies and unique vegetation.

Unfortunately I won’t be able to post any images of my journey until I get home as sending large image files via satellite is incredibly expensive. A passenger on the previous trip downloaded a single image that his daughter had sent of his new grandchild which he was thrilled to get even after he received the bill for 250 Euros! (£185/$280).