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Humpback whale playing with kelp

Why do humpback whales wear seaweed wigs?

Alison Wood Ali is WDC's education projects coordinator. She is the editor of Splash! and KIDZONE,...
Japanese whaling ship

WDC in Japan – Part 5: The meaning of whaling

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Risso's dolphins off the Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Unravelling the mysteries of Risso’s dolphins – WDC in action

Nicola Hodgins Nicola is WDC's cetacean science coordinator. She leads our long-term Risso's dolphin research...
Save the whale save the world on a tv in a meeting room.

Saving whales in boardrooms and on boats

Abbie Cheesman Abbie is WDC's head of strategic partnerships. She works with leading businesses to...
Outcomes of COP28

Outcomes for whales and dolphins from COP28

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...
Taiji's cove with boats rounding up dolphins to be slaughtered or sold to aquraiums

WDC in Japan – Part 4: A journey to Taiji’s killing cove

Katrin Matthes Katrin is WDC's communications and campaigns officer for policy & communication in Germany...
Blue whale at surface

Creating a safe haven for whales and dolphins in the Southern Ocean

Emma Eastcott Emma is WDC's head of safe seas. She helps ensure whales and dolphins...
We're at COP28 to Save the Whale, Save the World.

We’re at COP28 to save the whale, save the world

Ed Goodall Ed is WDC's head of intergovernmental engagement. He meets with world leaders to...

Is this dolphin family doomed?

Wave was one of the matriachs of the Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary. She was born about 1992 and had the first (Bronny, a male) of her six calves in 2002. Her second calf (Ripple, a female) was born in 2006. Her last three calves all died and Wave disappeared after the death of her last calf in September, 2014. Wave is almost certainly dead.

Wave was famous for her tail walking and for surviving a horrendous injury in 2010.

About a week ago Ripple gave birth to her first calf, which we called Marea. We hope the calf survives but we noticed numerous lesions on thelittle dolphin’s head and we are gravely concerned, especially as Ripple was seen without the calf today.

And to add to our dismay, I just had a message that Bronny was found washed up on the shore of the Port River. At this stage we have no information on cause of death.

So in space of just a few years the death list is Wave (mother); four calves; and a “grand calf”. From a family of eight it seems there will be only two survivors. We did not manage to collect any of the dead calves but we do have Bronny’s body and we are hopeful the necropsy will give us information on the cause of death.

UPDATE: 11 February, 2015

Very sad update on our Adelaide dolphins… We did a survey today and located Ripple but there was no sign of her calf Marea. We are forced to conclude that Marea has died. There were two calves born in the Port River this summer that we know of and both have died.

To support our vital work with this fragile population and help us protect the remaining family members, please go to https://au.whales.org/adopt-port-river-dolphin