Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching

Hopes raised for whale and dolphin protection after last minute landmark nature agreement

WDC's Ed Goodall (far right) at COP15 with Thérèse Coffey (centre) UK Secretary of State...

WDC orca champion picks up award

Beatrice Whishart MSP picks up her Nature Champion award The Scottish Environment LINK, an organisation...

Large number of dolphins moved to Abu Dhabi marine park

Up to 24 captive bottlenose dolphins have reportedly been sent to a new SeaWorld theme...

Success! Removal of last river dams to help threatened orcas in the US

Great news has emerged from the US concerning our work to protect the endangered orca...

New WDC research reveals story behind whale scars

WDC research fellow and co-director of the Russian Cetacean Habitat Project, Erich Hoyt has revealed that one of the most mysterious whale species form long-term alliances.

By identifying individual whales by scars on their bodies, the recently release research highlights that Baird’s beaked whales Baird’s beaked whales , sometimes called giant bottlenose whales, seem to prefer the company of specific individuals.

Erich calls on all hunting of the species to be halted while more information is gathered about their complex social structure.

Read more on the BBC website here.

More on the Russian habitat project here.