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Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Sperm whale (physeter macrocephalus) Gulf of California. The tail of a sperm whale.

To protect whales, we must stop ignoring the high seas

Almost two-thirds of the ocean, or 95% of the habitable space on Earth, are sloshing...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...

A ’Bonnie’ Fish For Breakfast…

Hi Everyone,

I did one of my “low tide ’til high tide” shifts at Chanonry Point very early yesterday as the weather was reasonable for a change and I had a few dolphins sighted & identified during the 6 hours or so. The first dolphin to appear just after sunrise was big ID#706 – a solitary male that I haven’t seen at Chanonry at all this season so I was really happy at seeing him happy and healthy and he caught a lovely big fish. Then ID#744 “Bonnie” and her year old calf came and joined him for a while but he, shy boy that he is, moved away to finish his fish in peace. Bonnie chased after a big fish and then brought it back into the tidal current and I got a few nice frames of her breakfast in the improving light.

 photo BonnieampSalmon.jpg

A bit later, Sundance came wandering past with Zephyr, Breeze and ID#990 “Flake” but they didn’t hang around and headed back out to sea having not found any fish for themselves.

Best Wishes,

Charlie.