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Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...
Mykines Lighthouse, Faroe Islands

Understanding whale and dolphin hunts in the Faroe Islands – why change is not easy

Most people in my home country of the Faroe Islands would like to see an...

Dolphin scientists look like you and me – citizen science in action

Our amazing volunteers have looked out for dolphins from the shores of Scotland more than...
Atlantic white-sided dolphins

The Faroes dolphin slaughter that sparked an outcry now brings hope

Since the slaughter of at least 1,423 Atlantic white-sided dolphins at Skálafjørður in my home...
Fin whale

From managing commercial slaughter to saving the whale – the International Whaling Commission at 75

Governments come together under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) to make decisions...

Ringing in the (wildlife) changes at the Scottish Dolphin Centre

Volunteering as a guide at the Scottish Dolphin Centre this summer, I’ve gotten used to telling visitors that we’ve been seeing the Moray Firth bottlenose dolphins at least once a day, with often spectacular displays of breaching.  However, as the summer is making way for autumn and the salmon are running a little less, I’ve found my sightings of them to be less often and less exuberant.  That’s not to say they aren’t making delightful appearances (such as earlier this week – at least ten dolphins swimming and splashing their way past Spey Bay), but now each one to me becomes that bit more special as, in two short months, I’ll be leaving this amazing place and saying see you later (definitely not goodbye!) to the largest bottlenose dolphins in the world.

When we carry out our shorewatches at Spey Bay, as well as any dolphin sightings, we also record any ospreys that we see.  My last sighting of one was on the 1st September and will likely be one of my last as they are now starting to make their long journey back to Africa for the winter.  Watching these stunning birds hovering at great height, then swooping down for (hopefully) a successful fish catch is always a thrill and I wish them well on their long flight south.

Although the dolphins might be the reason for WDC being here at Spey Bay, as many of the other centre volunteers’ blogs have shown, the other wildlife to be seen and enjoyed is just as great. Just recently we ran a Twilight Walk to discover what life wakes up after the sun goes down.  The evening was a great success, with encounters of bats, moths, deer and even the haunting call of a tawny owl!

With the first hints of autumn in the air the wildlife around here is changing; some creatures are on their way to pastures new and others will be coming back to revisit their winter homes, all of which I’m looking forward to experiencing at Spey Bay.