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We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...
Mykines Lighthouse, Faroe Islands

Understanding whale and dolphin hunts in the Faroe Islands – why change is not easy

Most people in my home country of the Faroe Islands would like to see an...

Dolphin scientists look like you and me – citizen science in action

Our amazing volunteers have looked out for dolphins from the shores of Scotland more than...
Atlantic white-sided dolphins

The Faroes dolphin slaughter that sparked an outcry now brings hope

Since the slaughter of at least 1,423 Atlantic white-sided dolphins at Skálafjørður in my home...

It’s White Alright …!!

In the past year, global attention has been on a young albino bottlenose dolphin calf called Angel (or Shoujo) who was captured in the Taiji drive hunts in January. Angel is currently living in small, cramped and confined conditions in the Taiji Aquarium where sadly her life will be a far cry from what she would have experienced had she been left with her family in the wild. However, for another albino bottlenose dolphin the future is hopefully much brighter!

Researchers at the Blue World Institute in Croatia knew that there was an albino dolphin in their survey area of the Adriatic and Mediterranean Seas but no good quality photographs existed and therefore very little was known about its sex, age, health and condition. A chance encounter the other day soon put paid to some of their questions as they encountered “Albus” happily feeding alongside another normal coloured bottlenose dolphin. Given the behaviour of the two dolphins, they are making an educated guess that Albus is in fact a “he” as adult male bottlenose dolphins in the Adriatic usually spend their time in pairs or small groups and only join females when it’s time to mate.

In general, albino dolphins are as healthy as those with normal colouration, however there can be some associated issues that affect their vision and/or hearing, they may find it more difficult to attract a mate and may face a higher risk of sun-damage. 

Albus (latin for “white”) however has successfully made it to adulthood and it is hoped that he will live a long and happy life swimming wild and free.