Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching

More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

Orphaned wild orca reappears with own family

Springer, believed to be the first orca to be rescued, rehabilitated and successfully released back into the wild, has been spotted for the first time this summer by researchers in the waters off British Columbia. Excitingly, she was accompanied by her calf, first seen in 2013. This is particularly significant as it means the calf has survived its first year of life, once of the most challenging times for an orca.

In January 2002, Springer (or A73) was found apart from her pod and ill in Puget Sound, near Seattle. Her mother was dead and it was thought that she was unlikely to survive on her own. She was then held in a huge ocean pen whilst a plan was formulated. Later, in July 2002 she was transported to Blackfish Sound, near Alert Bay off northern Vancouver Island, held in another sea pen and then released when her pod appeared.