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Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

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Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...
Mykines Lighthouse, Faroe Islands

Understanding whale and dolphin hunts in the Faroe Islands – why change is not easy

Most people in my home country of the Faroe Islands would like to see an...

Dolphin scientists look like you and me – citizen science in action

Our amazing volunteers have looked out for dolphins from the shores of Scotland more than...
Atlantic white-sided dolphins

The Faroes dolphin slaughter that sparked an outcry now brings hope

Since the slaughter of at least 1,423 Atlantic white-sided dolphins at Skálafjørður in my home...
Fin whale

From managing commercial slaughter to saving the whale – the International Whaling Commission at 75

Governments come together under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) to make decisions...

Global interest in report on impacts of marine renewable energy on whales and dolphins

While generating increasing amounts of energy from marine renewable sources such as wind, wave or tides could help reduce our overreliance on fossil fuels, marine renewable energy developments (MREDs) that are designed, placed, built, operated and decommissioned without a thought for their potential impact on local whale and dolphin populations could prove disastrous. 

To highlight the potential impacts posed to whales and dolphins by current and future MREDs, WDC published a report in late 2013 entitled Marine Renewable Energy: A Global Review of the Extent of Marine Renewable Energy Developments, the Developing Technologies and Possible Conservation Implications for Cetaceans

This report is aimed at governments, MRED developers and other key parties in the marine renewable energy industry. It has proved highly popular, with requests for copies of the report coming from Canada, the USA, China and Uruguay, and from governments, charities, offshore renewable developers and students worldwide.

It’s no surprise that there should be an avid global audience for such a report – while MREDs have until recent years mostly been located in European waters, more recently China and the USA have seen accelerating expansions of MREDs in their waters too.

Feedback from readers of the report has been gratifyingly positive, with readers stating, for example, that ‘we have needed for years a report that brings all this information into one place’ and ‘this is extremely useful’. Readers say they particularly appreciate the detail of the results of current research and the recommendations for governments and developers.

Off the back of the report, developers and governmental organisations have been contacting WDC to arrange meetings and to seek further advice, particularly regarding mitigation measures and monitoring of whales and dolphins in development areas.

WDC supports the development of marine renewable energy and recommends that it is located away from critical and important areas for whales, dolphins and porpoises to avoid negatively impacting them.