Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...
Mykines Lighthouse, Faroe Islands

Understanding whale and dolphin hunts in the Faroe Islands – why change is not easy

Most people in my home country of the Faroe Islands would like to see an...

Dolphin scientists look like you and me – citizen science in action

Our amazing volunteers have looked out for dolphins from the shores of Scotland more than...
Atlantic white-sided dolphins

The Faroes dolphin slaughter that sparked an outcry now brings hope

Since the slaughter of at least 1,423 Atlantic white-sided dolphins at Skálafjørður in my home...

Hey UK, Turks and Caicos Humpbacks Need You too!

A recent BBC report highlights the need for better wildlife protection in UK overseas territories including the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI).  Along with the issues covered in the article, endangered humpback whales are also facing threats in this region.  Historically considered as a migratory corridor to the breeding and calving grounds off the Dominican Republic, WDC data suggests TCI waters may be part of the breeding range for North Atlantic humpbacks.  The threat of ship strikes, habitat degradation and pressures from tourism are increasing for whales in this region, leaving mothers and newborn calves most vulnerable. 

WDC not only agrees that increasing protections are needed, but also calls for the UK to increase funding for education in this area.  In partnership with the School for Field Studies, WDC has initiated an education program for TCI students on South Caicos.  “We were shocked to learn that some local children didn’t even realize that whales lived off their coasts” said Monica Pepe, Conservation and Education Manager for WDC. “While funding conservation programs is essential, so is ensuring that the residents of the Turks and Caicos know about their natural resources and are empowered to protect them.” 

This spring WDC’s North American office launched a program that connected students in the Turks and Caicos with students up the road from our office in Plymouth, Mass.  Not only did they learn about whales and their habitats, they also participated in a cultural exchange by recording videos of their respective classes talking about everyday life (favorite foods, length of school day, average weather conditions, etc.).  The goal of this project is for students to learn about the different regions humpbacks utilize and instill a sense of responsibility for protecting them.

WDC is seeking funding to continue its work to protect the humpback whales of TCI and to continue education programs in both the US and the Turks and Caicos Islands.