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More important ocean areas for whales and dolphin protection identified

Scientists and observers from many different countries have identified and mapped 36 new Important Marine...

Whale meat fetches record high at Japan auction

Sei whale meat is being sold at a record high in Japan according media reports...

Rescuers find young girl’s body surrounded by dolphins

Reports from South Africa about a tragic drowning off Llandudno beach, Cape Town say that...
The Yushin Maru catcher ship of the Japanese whaling fleet injures a whale with its first harpoon attempt, and takes a further three harpoon shots before finally killing the badly injured fleeing whale. Finally they drowned the mammal beneath the harpooon deck of the ship to kill it.  Southern Ocean.  07.01.2006

Moves to overturn whaling ban rejected

Last week, the 68th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC, the body that regulates...

More bad news for Sea World as poor financial results are revealed

Following the recent 13 percent fall in visitor numbers, Sea World’s first quarter earnings for 2014 have now been released and show an 11 percent decrease on last year’s first quarter to $212.3 million. The latest fall comes on the back of the recent negative, global public reaction to the captivity industry which followed the release of the film, Blackfish.  The film, which has gripped audiences around the world, looks into the shocking death of Sea World trainer, Dawn Brancheau, who was killed in 2010 when the orca Tillikum dragged her under the water in front of horrified spectators at Sea World in Orlando, Florida. The film also looks at many other similar incidents and raises safety questions about the wider captivity industry as a whole.

Sea World recently tried to discredit the film and its claims that wild killer whales live more than twice as long as those in SeaWorld. But the discovery near Vancouver Island two weeks ago of a 103-year-old orca whale (named Granny J2) seems to have put paid to Sea World’s argument.