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Mindful conservation – why we need a new respect for nature

'We should look at whales and dolphins as the indigenous people of the seas -...
A dolphin called Arnie with a shell

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

Did you know that dolphins have unique personalities?

We all have personalities, and between the work Christmas party and your family get-together, perhaps...
Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...
Humpback whale. Image: Christopher Swann

A story about whales and humans

As well as working for WDC, I write books for young people. Stories; about the...
Risso's dolphin at surface

My lucky number – 13 years studying amazing Risso’s dolphins

Everything we learn about the Risso's dolphins off the coast of Scotland amazes us and...
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...

Spotted! Wildlife wandering around Spey Bay

Wow, I can’t believe it’s May already! Here at the Scottish Dolphin Centre we’ve been busy welcoming visitors to our exhibition, shop and café and telling them all about the wildlife they can spot around the nature reserve where the centre is located.  We are very lucky to be based at such a brilliant wildlife watching spot – in the last few days there have been regular sightings of osprey, seals and, of course, the Moray Firth bottlenose dolphins (with lots of jumping, breaching and general aquabatics to be seen!)

As well as these ‘regulars’ we’ve spotted some more shy and retiring species, which has been fantastic for us to see and also to tell our visitors about. Deer have been spotted out and about around Spey Bay and, on a recent drive to a community talk with Lorna the Dolphin Centre’s Education Officer, we happened across a red squirrel. It was a day of firsts for me as not only did I spot my first red squirrel – which I can now tick off my wildlife spotting wish list – it was also the first time I had given a community talk. The members of the Banff and District Probus Club were very welcoming and it was a pleasure to talk to them about the cetacean species found in the seas around Scotland and the work WDC does to protect these amazing creatures.

Deer ©Aimee Burrows

Everywhere I look trees are bursting into lush green and flowers into a riot of colour, with Spey Bay becoming a real hotspot for creatures great and small. It feels as if spring has finally sprung and I don’t think I could be in a better place to experience nature’s sights and sounds.  Next up for me to look forward to will be the Dawn Chorus walk around the Scottish Dolphin Centre.  From 5am-7am on Sunday 11th May we’ll be joining our avian neighbours to welcome in the new day. Booking is essential and spaces are still available so please call 01343 820339 for more information and to book a place.