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Fin whale

Fin whales return to old feeding grounds in Southern Ocean

An exciting discovery by researchers in the waters around Antarctica suggest that fin whales are...
Majestic fin whales

Icelandic whalers kill first fin whales in four years

As feared, whale hunters in Iceland have slaughtered at least two fin whales, the first...
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...

Poisonous algae may have killed hundreds of dolphins in Peru

Scientists from Peru’s Ocean Institute (IMARPE) think they’ve discovered the cause of the mass dolphin deaths along the northern coast of Peru: poisonous algae.

Hundreds of dolphins have washed up on different beaches in the region and, according to reports, tissue samples taken by scientists from some of the dolphins have revealed that the animals had ingested a substance that had caused their internal organs to degenerate.

Though it’s hard to know exactly what the animals could have consumed in order to produce this kind of biological reaction, scientists think that naturally-occurring toxins in certain algae could be to blame. Poisonous compounds in the algae could have been activated by changes in temperature or pollution and further tests will need to be carried out.

Meanwhile, dead marine mammals continue to be washed ashore. In Lambayeque, 79.9 % of all specimens found so far are different species of dolphin.