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Hopes raised for whale and dolphin protection after last minute landmark nature agreement

WDC's Ed Goodall (far right) at COP15 with Thérèse Coffey (centre) UK Secretary of State...

WDC orca champion picks up award

Beatrice Whishart MSP picks up her Nature Champion award The Scottish Environment LINK, an organisation...

Large number of dolphins moved to Abu Dhabi marine park

Up to 24 captive bottlenose dolphins have reportedly been sent to a new SeaWorld theme...

Success! Removal of last river dams to help threatened orcas in the US

Great news has emerged from the US concerning our work to protect the endangered orca...

Poisonous algae may have killed hundreds of dolphins in Peru

Scientists from Peru’s Ocean Institute (IMARPE) think they’ve discovered the cause of the mass dolphin deaths along the northern coast of Peru: poisonous algae.

Hundreds of dolphins have washed up on different beaches in the region and, according to reports, tissue samples taken by scientists from some of the dolphins have revealed that the animals had ingested a substance that had caused their internal organs to degenerate.

Though it’s hard to know exactly what the animals could have consumed in order to produce this kind of biological reaction, scientists think that naturally-occurring toxins in certain algae could be to blame. Poisonous compounds in the algae could have been activated by changes in temperature or pollution and further tests will need to be carried out.

Meanwhile, dead marine mammals continue to be washed ashore. In Lambayeque, 79.9 % of all specimens found so far are different species of dolphin.