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WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...
We need whale poo ? WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...
Humpback whale underwater

Climate giants – how whales can help save the world

We know that whales, dolphins and porpoises are amazing beings with complex social and family...
Black Sea common dolphins © Elena Gladilina

The dolphin and porpoise casualties of the war in Ukraine

Rare, threatened subspecies of dolphins and porpoises live in the Black Sea along Ukraine's coast....
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...

What does “success” looks like for WDC’s projects and campaigns

Perhaps one metric for success that we should strive for is to have the number of North Atlantic right whales greater than the number of people working to save them. With fewer than 500 North Atlantic right whales remaining, we are far from meeting that goal. The fatalities they face from ship strikes and fishing gear entanglements remain the primary threats, but the army of people working to eradicate these threats and save the whales is inspiring.

Sign an updated petition to maintain the protections of the Ship Strike Speed Rule

For example last month WDC, along with the Humane Society of the United States, Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife and 14 other conservation organizations, scientists and academics, asked the US government to maintain a fishery restriction in right whale calving habitat to protect the vulnerable newborn right whales from entanglement. Then Dr. Michael Moore of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution published an essay last week on the welfare impacts of entanglements on right whales.  Coincidentally, this week Clay George and his team from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources removed more than 280 feet of fishing line from an entangled right whale, highlights the importance of maintaining the fishery restrictions. 

Another example of the inspirational work being done is the success of our efforts petitioning the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to permanently extended the Ship Strike Speed Rule, which reduced the risk of ship strikes to right whales by nearly 90%!

Unfortunately, this rule is already being challenged by the American Pilots Association, and today I am asking you to sign an updated petition to maintain the protections of the ship strike speed rule throughout the entire east coast of the US. 

We’ve all heard parents, teachers, and caregivers encourage young children to use their words to express their opinion and exert their influence – Please become part of this impressive army of scientists, advocates, and conservationists and use the power of your words to tell the US government that right whales deserved to be protected.