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A dolphin called Arnie with a shell

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

Did you know that dolphins have unique personalities?

We all have personalities, and between the work Christmas party and your family get-together, perhaps...
Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...
Humpback whale. Image: Christopher Swann

A story about whales and humans

As well as working for WDC, I write books for young people. Stories; about the...
Risso's dolphin at surface

My lucky number – 13 years studying amazing Risso’s dolphins

Everything we learn about the Risso's dolphins off the coast of Scotland amazes us and...
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...

What does “success” looks like for WDC’s projects and campaigns

Perhaps one metric for success that we should strive for is to have the number of North Atlantic right whales greater than the number of people working to save them. With fewer than 500 North Atlantic right whales remaining, we are far from meeting that goal. The fatalities they face from ship strikes and fishing gear entanglements remain the primary threats, but the army of people working to eradicate these threats and save the whales is inspiring.

Sign an updated petition to maintain the protections of the Ship Strike Speed Rule

For example last month WDC, along with the Humane Society of the United States, Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife and 14 other conservation organizations, scientists and academics, asked the US government to maintain a fishery restriction in right whale calving habitat to protect the vulnerable newborn right whales from entanglement. Then Dr. Michael Moore of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution published an essay last week on the welfare impacts of entanglements on right whales.  Coincidentally, this week Clay George and his team from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources removed more than 280 feet of fishing line from an entangled right whale, highlights the importance of maintaining the fishery restrictions. 

Another example of the inspirational work being done is the success of our efforts petitioning the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to permanently extended the Ship Strike Speed Rule, which reduced the risk of ship strikes to right whales by nearly 90%!

Unfortunately, this rule is already being challenged by the American Pilots Association, and today I am asking you to sign an updated petition to maintain the protections of the ship strike speed rule throughout the entire east coast of the US. 

We’ve all heard parents, teachers, and caregivers encourage young children to use their words to express their opinion and exert their influence – Please become part of this impressive army of scientists, advocates, and conservationists and use the power of your words to tell the US government that right whales deserved to be protected.