Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Sperm whale (physeter macrocephalus) Gulf of California. The tail of a sperm whale.

To protect whales, we must stop ignoring the high seas

Almost two-thirds of the ocean, or 95% of the habitable space on Earth, are sloshing...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...

Breach! Support the film the whalers don’t want you to see

I spoke last night to Los Angeles-based writer, director and film maker, Jonathan (Jonny) Zwick.  Jonny spent three months in Iceland last summer shooting footage for Breach, an independent documentary film that focuses on the cultural, scientific and economic ‘justifications’ which underpin the Icelandic whaling industry – and systematically deconstructs them. His film juxtaposes images of the starkly beautiful Icelandic landscape and rich natural history, with jarring images of the slaughter of fin and minke whales.  He allows a whole range of people – from whalers to whale watchers; government scientists to conservationists, as well as ordinary Icelandic citizens – to voice their opinions via voiceovers and ‘talking head’ interviews and in so doing, allows both sides to expose the blinding contradictions inherent in Icelandic whaling.  As he puts it:  “My film focuses on the spectacular ironies, contradictions and unethical decisions surrounding the attempts made by the whaling industry and the Icelandic government to convince people that there is still a market for this meat.” 

Back home in the US, Jonny has created a Kickstarter to find the funds required now to cover translation, editing and distribution costs. You can see a trailer of the documentary and find out more about the vision that drove this film to be made.

This ‘crowd funding’ initiative ends on February 20th.  If Jonny reaches his target, he can complete his film and take it to Iceland, where he wants to show it to as many people as possible – particularly youth audiences.

I’ll leave the last word to Jonny, but I hope that he will find the funds to complete his project: this is a film that absolutely needed to be made, and now, more than ever, absolutely needs to be ‘out there’.

I put myself in uncomfortable and sometimes dangerous situations while covering this story. I went on a minke-whale hunt, interviewed whalers in their own home, followed truck drivers transporting whale meat to isolated locations in the middle of the night, and was chased out of the Hvalur whale processing plant by rampant whale flensers.

The pieces have been gathered, and now we just need to put them in place. The better the movie is, the more people will watch. The more people who watch, the more people will know. The more people who know, the more whales will be saved.”