Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
Dead sperm whale in The Wash, East Anglia, England. © CSIP-ZSL.

What have dead whales ever done for us?

When dead whales wash up on dry land they provide a vital food source for...
Risso's dolphin © Andy Knight

We’re getting to know Risso’s dolphins in Scotland so we can protect them

Citizen scientists in Scotland are helping us better understand Risso's dolphins by sending us their...
Pilot whales pooing © Christopher Swann

Talking crap and carcasses to protect our planet

We know we need to save the whale to save the world because they are...
Fin whales are targeted by Icelandic whalers

Speaking truth to power – my week giving whales a voice

The International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting is where governments come together to make decisions about whaling...

Why do whales and dolphins strand on beaches?

People often ask me 'why' whales and dolphins do one thing or another.  I'm a...
A spinner dolphin leaping © Andrew Sutton/Eco2

Head in a spin – my incredible spinner dolphin encounter

Sri Lanka is home to at least 30 species of whales and dolphins, from the...
Sperm whale (physeter macrocephalus) Gulf of California. The tail of a sperm whale.

To protect whales, we must stop ignoring the high seas

Almost two-thirds of the ocean, or 95% of the habitable space on Earth, are sloshing...
WDC team at UN Ocean conference

Give the ocean a chance – our message from the UN Ocean Conference

I'm looking out over the River Tejo in Lisbon, Portugal, reflecting on the astounding resilience...

New Australian Government Puts The World’s Largest MPA On Hold

The Australian MPA Network

The incoming Conservative Government has set aside previously agreed management plans and is instigating a review to determine future boundaries and acceptable activities. The Government has cited the reasons for its decision as a need for ‘genuine consultation with fishers and other stakeholders’.

The Government has been caught hook, line and sinker by the commercial and recreational fisher sectors. The previous management plans were as a result of six rounds of public consultation over six years and over three quarters of a million people provided submissions into the marine parks process, including thousands of WDC supporters both here and abroad. The final network of marine parks was supported by 70 per cent of Australians. The only rational for the Government’s decision is to try and wind back hard fought gains in the number of sanctuary zones established as part of the consultation process.

The Marine Reserves Review will appoint two advisory panels to help drive the process. There will be keen interest in the composition of those panels when announced.