Skip to content
All news
  • All news
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Corporates
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Stop whaling
  • Stranding
  • Whale watching
Humpback whale underwater

Humpback whale rescued from shark net in Australia

A humpback whale and her calf have managed to escape after becoming entangled in a...
Humpback whales in Alaska

Pumps and conveyor belts. How could more whales help save us?

We are excited to announce backing for two ground-breaking research projects to assess the little...
Amazon River dolphin (Boto)

River dolphins observed playing with anaconda

Researchers in Bolivia recorded an unusual interaction between local rivers dolphins and an anaconda snake...
Common bottlenose dolphin

Dolphin pens identified at Russian naval base

Analysis of satellite imagery suggests that Russia may be using military dolphins at its naval...

Pollution threatens future of white dolphins in China

Researchers in China are growing increasingly concerned about levels of pollution threatening the survival of Chinese white dolphins.  Marine biologists at the Sun Yat-sen University (SYSU) in southern China’s Guangdong province claim that the species will drop by 74% in the next 60 years because of the amount of heavy metals, such as mercury and lead, found in the Pearl River Delta, south of China’s east coast.  These pollutants cause damage to the dolphins nervous system and immune system, and are increasing the chances of the Chinese white dolphin becoming extinct.

The pollution stems from insecticide and fertilizers used in the area, leading to calls for the Chinese authorities to improve the water quality in south China’s Pearl river estuary to ensure the species’ survival.

Chinese white dolphins, also known as Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins, are coastal animals that can venturing quite far landward into estuaries and mangroves.