Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
Fishers' involvement is crucial. Image: WDC/JTF

When porpoises and people overlap

We're funding a project in Hong Kong that's working with fishing communities to help save...

Mindful conservation – why we need a new respect for nature

'We should look at whales and dolphins as the indigenous people of the seas -...
A dolphin called Arnie with a shell

Dolphins catch fish using giant shell tools

In Shark Bay, Australia, two groups of dolphins have figured out how to use tools...
Common dolphins at surface

Did you know that dolphins have unique personalities?

We all have personalities, and between the work Christmas party and your family get-together, perhaps...
Leaping harbour porpoise

The power of harbour porpoise poo

We know we need to save the whale to save the world. Now we are...
Holly. Image: Miray Campbell

Meet Holly, she’s an incredible orca leader

Let me tell you the story of an awe-inspiring orca with a fascinating family story...
Humpback whale. Image: Christopher Swann

A story about whales and humans

As well as working for WDC, I write books for young people. Stories; about the...
Risso's dolphin at surface

My lucky number – 13 years studying amazing Risso’s dolphins

Everything we learn about the Risso's dolphins off the coast of Scotland amazes us and...

A Hard Rock Massage

We learned last week that beluga whales are the true white whales, except when they’re babies, but they also aren’t always white as adults!  In spring and summer, when belugas start gathering in estuaries and shallow-water areas, they actually have a yellowish tint to their skin.  Belugas undergo a seasonal molt, meaning that one layer of skin is shed while a new one grows in its place.  To help with the removal of old skin (and its yellow shade), belugas will use the rocky beds of their shallow summer homes as a nice exfoliating massage, rubbing off the external layer – and getting a wonderful scratch!

Belugas in captivity still molt, but the fake substrates and materials provided in tanks are not nearly as satisfying as a good rock rub.  In the wild, molting is an important part of their seasonal migration cycle, and provides an opportunity for them to socialize and “check in” with their summer homes.

Belugas’ skin turns yellow when it is time to molt (image from The Huffington Post)

This week, we’re asking the popular restaurant chain Hard Rock Café to include belugas in their philanthropic causes.  Hard Rock says their goal is to “make the Earth a safer, healthier and better place for all,” and guides their actions by the motto “Love all, Serve all.”  WDC wants them to include belugas in their philanthropic efforts, & love all, serve all belugas, too!  Captivity is not safer, healthier, or better!

Thank you for helping keep belugas safe and free, and go get yourself a nice exfoliating massage this week – just like a beluga!