Skip to content
All articles
  • All articles
  • About whales & dolphins
  • Create healthy seas
  • End captivity
  • Green Whale
  • Prevent deaths in nets
  • Scottish Dolphin Centre
  • Stop whaling
We need whale poo 📷 WDC NA

Whales are our climate allies – meet the scientists busy proving it

At Whale and Dolphin Conservation, we're working hard to bring whales and the ocean into...
Minke whale © Ursula Tscherter - ORES

The whale trappers are back with their cruel experiment

Anyone walking past my window might have heard my groan of disbelief at the news...
Boto © Fernando Trujillo

Meet the legendary pink river dolphins

Botos don't look or live like other dolphins. Flamingo-pink all over with super-skinny snouts and...
Risso's dolphin entangled in fishing line and plastic bags - Andrew Sutton

The ocean is awash with plastic – can we ever clean it up?

You've seen pictures of plastic litter accumulating on beaches or marine wildlife swimming through floating...
Fin whale

Is this the beginning of the end for whaling off Iceland?

I'm feeling cautiously optimistic after Iceland's Fisheries Minister Svandís Svavarsdóttir wrote that there is little...
Mykines Lighthouse, Faroe Islands

Understanding whale and dolphin hunts in the Faroe Islands – why change is not easy

Most people in my home country of the Faroe Islands would like to see an...

Dolphin scientists look like you and me – citizen science in action

Our amazing volunteers have looked out for dolphins from the shores of Scotland more than...
Atlantic white-sided dolphins

The Faroes dolphin slaughter that sparked an outcry now brings hope

Since the slaughter of at least 1,423 Atlantic white-sided dolphins at Skálafjørður in my home...

Are Japanese whalers hunting whales from Australia?

Andrew Darby, author and friend of the whales, reports that ‘Australian scientists have tracked a minke whale from the Great Barrier Reef deep into the subantarctic for the first time’.

There has been concern for some time that Japan has been hunting endangered minke whales in the North Pacific, but now it appears that minke whales being killed to keep a dying industry alive and some false sense of nationalistic pride, are also potentially having an impact on Australian whale watching.

Darby repotrts that, ‘Until now, the Japanese ”scientific” hunt, which kills minkes, was thought to harpoon whales that lived almost exclusively in the Antarctic. But a satellite tracking program on dwarf minke whales, the focus of growing reef tourism, followed one nicknamed Spot deep into the Southern Ocean before its tag expired. Asked whether these whales could be taken by the whalers, CSIRO environmental scientist Matt Curnock said: ”We are very concerned about that, yes.’

The report notes that Australian scientists had recorded a tagged minke whale swimming ‘into the Southern Ocean as far as 54.38 degrees south – iceberg territory – making a journey of 6000 kilometres before the final transmission on October 11.’

This revalation of the amazing migratory movements of minke whales follows hot on the heels of Australia”s legal challenge to Japan and the International Court of Justice.

You can find out more about whaling in Japan and the legal challenge.

If you have not read it, we would heartely recommend Andrew Darby’s book ‘Harpoon‘ on the issue of whaling.