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Hopes raised for whale and dolphin protection after last minute landmark nature agreement

WDC's Ed Goodall (far right) at COP15 with Thérèse Coffey (centre) UK Secretary of State...

WDC orca champion picks up award

Beatrice Whishart MSP picks up her Nature Champion award The Scottish Environment LINK, an organisation...

Large number of dolphins moved to Abu Dhabi marine park

Up to 24 captive bottlenose dolphins have reportedly been sent to a new SeaWorld theme...

Success! Removal of last river dams to help threatened orcas in the US

Great news has emerged from the US concerning our work to protect the endangered orca...

Three minke whales wash up on UK shores

Three minke whales have washed up dead on UK shores in recent days – one off the coast of Northern Ireland and the other two, unusually, off the cost of Norfolk. Strandings happen for many reasons and, unless the whale is examined soon after death, it is very difficult to find the cause. Errors in navigation may have led to these whales becoming trapped in shallower water, but illness can not be ruled out.

Some whales and dolphins come ashore after suffering injury from boat propellers or entanglement in fishing nets and gear. Nets and fishing gear are the biggest killer of whales and dolphins across the globe, causing terrible injury and typically death by suffocation. Noise from military exercises (using loud explosions or powerful sonar), or from exploration surveys at sea for oil and gas could also cause whales and dolphins to strand on the shoreline.